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Travelling or going on holiday? Read this first

Plane on runway, flying with thrombosis
Even if you are a frequent flyer, or prefer to take things as they come, it can be a good idea to consider some important factors before you take off. Here are a few tips to keep you out of a sticky situation so that you can focus on that dream holiday instead:
  • Set multiple reminders so you don’t forget to pack your medicine: a note on your door, alarm on your phone and a note on your packing list. 
  • Start packing early – take out your empty suitcase and put some of your medicine inside. If you are taking multiple bags, distribute a few portions of medicine between them, in case one of them gets lost. 
  • If you are allowed, pack at least a few portions of your medicine in your carry on. That will give you easy access and ensure you have some available should your checked baggage get lost. 
  • Be sure to find a way to bring your medicine on board if you have to travel on a long-haul flight over the course of 1-2 days. Call your airport(s) ahead of time to check if there are any procedures you need to consider. 
  • Be sure to pack your medication in its original packaging. If there is an emergency, the local doctors will need to know what treatment you are on.
  • Make a note of the generic name as well as the trade name as some countries may use a different trade name. The generic name will always be the same. It is often written under the trade name in lower case letters. 
  • It could be good to contact the local pharmacy in advance, and find out whether they have your prescription in stock. Also make note of their opening hours and where they are located. 
  • Book an aisle seat ahead of time so you can more comfortably get up, move around and do circulation exercises (see below) during the flight. 
  • Many airports have special allowances for travelling with liquid medications in a carry-on. Call the airport ahead to check the rules. 
  • In case your medicine spills or gets lost, carry an extra prescription with you. This includes what dose you need to take. You may not be able to find your prescribed medication at a pharmacy at your travel destination. In that case, please seek medical advice on an alternative prescription.
  • Exercises for better blood circulation


    Important note: Be sure to consult your doctor before going on any long-haul travel during your DVT treatment. Just a few extra minutes of preparation can put your mind at ease, knowing that you are ready for any unexpected travel “bumps in the road”. That way you know your treatment is sorted and you can get back to what matters. 

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